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The tags and seem to not have a very clear purpose. Looking through those questions, it seems like most of them could be retagged to or .

They also don't have all that many uses (11 and 22 respectively), and neither has a tag wiki.

Should we burninate these tags, replacing them with or wherever necessary?

FYI: the title is a Dora the Explorer reference.

marked as duplicate by Journeyman Geek discussion Jul 16 at 10:12

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I agree, but you only found the tip of the issue. We also have tags for , , , , , , and that I found in a quick search (there's likely more). I think any language-specific tag serves no on-topic purpose.

and would cover a lot of them, but there are language-related ramifications that warrant their own tags because they relate to specific technology questions. For example, we already have . We also get a lot of questions dealing with "international" characters (e.g., how to enter, reproduce, or recognize them), international variations of keyboard layouts, etc., and we do have an tag. It may take some digging to ferret out all of the tags and their uses, and identify appropriate on-topic tags.

A good way to approach this kind of retagging is to start and do the obvious ones and see what's left. Searches on keywords will turn up other tag examples. Once the obvious examples have been fixed, it's easier to see common uses in the residual questions that might have enough questions to warrant a new dedicated on-topic tag if one doesn't already exist.

Update: I had forgotten about the post this one is marked as a duplicate of. Excellll posted an answer there, Take away the chinese tag, and it has a really good point. Many languages have unique features that only someone familiar with it would know. That makes the specific language tag important to attract the right people to answer the question.

Perhaps most of the relevant characteristics are covered by a limited number of categories, but those categories wouldn't be nearly as effective for tags. Question authors think in terms of the language, not the categories, and so do the people in the best position to answer.

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