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In this question, I am trying to ask for something that from user experience sounds very simple "I would like want an software that blocks something for me as administrator on a computer" (as xy-problem) where the software is already supplied (being switchhosts.exe) with a particular question on the implementation of the file removal prevention.

However, this seems to lead to the response an administrator can always do anything so what you ask is impossible. I am not able to clearly communicate that the user in the question is not equal to an actual administrator because the user in question has behavioral limitations, which result in a limitation of the practical power of the user, w.r.t. an actual administrator.

I expect this small gap in power w.r.t. an actual administrator can be used to encrypt a process such that the user can not stop the process nor delete it. And I assume the user can throw away the key to that encryption (once).

Question

What could I adapt to remove ambiguities from the question and/or reduce the amount of discussion (regarding administrator can always do anything)?

Doubt

It seems like it is a question about something that one should not want, because an administrator can always do anything so you're asking the impossible. Yet at the same time it can be quite practical real-life challenge that a user/admin might face in daily life.

Are there other perspectives on approaching this question from the fail-safe perspective (not improving yourself to fail less, but improving your system to mitigate failure consequences)?

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I want software that blocks something for me as administrator on a computer

Regardless of how you phrase it, asking for software is, by definition, off topic on Super User.

We even have a specific close reason for such questions:

Questions seeking product, service, or learning material recommendations are off-topic because they become outdated quickly and attract opinion-based answers. Instead, describe your situation and the specific problem you're trying to solve. Share your research. Here are a few suggestions on how to properly ask this type of question.

(emphasis mine)

There is also another site, Software Recommentations, where such questions are potentially on topic.

If you are going to ask there but please first read What is required for a question to contain "enough information".

What could I adapt to remove ambiguities from the question and/or reduce the amount of discussion (regarding administrator can always do anything)?

(emphasis mine)

There can be no discussion as "administrator can always do anything" is a true statement, so there is nothing to discuss. Discussion cannot change a true statement into a false statement.

You are asking for the impossible. Administrators on any operating system can do anything by definition. That is the whole purpose of being an Administrator.

Alternatively referred to as an admin, administrator, and gatekeeper, root is a superuser account on a computer or network and has complete control. When referring to a Unix and Linux computer, this user is often known as root. On a Windows computer and on a network, this user is often referred to as an administrator. However, each of these terms is interchangeable.

(emphasis mine)

Source What is an Administrator?

at the same time it can be quite practical real-life challenge that a user/admin might face in daily life.

This statement is also true. However these kinds of challenges (self control issues) are also off topic on Super User.

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  • Thank you, in this meta post I did not completely formulate the question, as the question does not request software (recommendations), but asks about a file close- and removal prevention mechanism in a particular condition. The administrator can do everything is not relevant since the assumptions describe a particular instance of an entity that "Windows" still calls administrator, but in reality is not equal what conventionally is called an administrator. I think I can conclude from your response that the use of the word administrator in the limited-ability setting is confusing. – a.t. Jul 28 at 17:27
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    "And I would like to prevent myself from deleting/disabling that software whilst maintaining administrator priviliges" You asking for the impossible. That's why I said "However these kinds of challenges (self control issues) are also off topic on Super User." – DavidPostill Jul 28 at 17:33
  • Thank you, I think I can clarify/refer to the assumptions pertaining to the user/self behavior (and hence the power of the entity I referred to as user with with administrator privileges) in that sentence. The self-control issues are indeed not a topic of discussion and simply taken as a constant/fact describing the privileges/power/access/capabilities of the non-administrator. – a.t. Jul 28 at 17:40
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    @a.t. - I don't see any path, that results in an edit to the question you asked, that turns your question into something that is within scope here at Super User. You cannot achieve your goal as a privileged user, a prevailed user on any operating system, or have access to a privileged user. Since what you want is not possible, and your question is asking for the impossible, there is no way to asked your question that results in a helpful high quality answer. – Ramhound Jul 28 at 17:52
  • @Ramhound, Perhaps the question is still not suited, but for my understanding: Based on the assumption that the user can not remove Windows, why would it not be possible with an encryption mechanism on/in Windows processes, if the lock is merged into Windows, a bit like how DRM is applied throughout a chain of execution? – a.t. Jul 28 at 18:20
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    @a.t. - Because the "encryption mechanism" you describe does not exist. There is FDE (Full Disk Encryption) and EFS (Encrypted File System) but neither would resolve your problem per the limits you describe. – Ramhound Jul 28 at 19:43

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