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Some moderations to close a question do not make sense here. The reason stated for the closing of question the at the top of the page, for example, says this question needs clarity. The OP has asked three clear explicit questions and expects answers. This is totally confusing and commenters are being seen engaged in a passive-aggressive voice with the OP arguing somewhat technically that the question has problems where in the eye of the OP with two decades of solid development experience, it does not.

Questions are meant to be answered or discussed about, not argued upon. Why is it this way? This is not the first time I am seeing this behavior in Stack Overflow & its sister sites. Is there any policy at all about this kind of behavior?

The problem here is that this attitude is not constructive and not in line with what Stack Exchange and its child sites intend to achieve, and not with one's expectation from a Q&A community.

Look at this one for an example: Firefox consuming 600 MB of memory with only 2 tabs open

Matter of fact is that I have seen such issues all around Stack Exchange sites and this is not especially related to the Superuser or any other certain sites.

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    “The problem here is that this attitude is not constructive and not in line with what Stack Exchange and its child sites intend to achieve, and not with one's expectation from a Q&A community.” I already posted a full answer to this, but when you state something like this? I don’t know. Basic advice: Please don’t overblow things that your personal disagreement over a closure with the goals of Stack Exchange. You had a question closed and down voted: Welcome to the club! We all have that happen. Now what else? Should SE sites be restructured to deal with you being upset over one question? – Giacomo1968 Nov 27 '20 at 5:17
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    When your questions are based on faulty premises people will tend to attempt to correct you, that is a feature of how information sharing works. Firefox is a large program with lots of video formats to handle, images to deal with, and modern Web pages, despite you being a "developer", are far more complex than you are giving them credit for. There is a lot of live updating, dynamic contextual scripting going on and the web now uses rather large application frameworks. A browser is essentially a sandboxed operating system for modern webpages. – Mokubai Nov 27 '20 at 10:50
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There is no question to your question and it is very open-ended and implies a false correlation between one thing and another.

“Some moderations to close a question do not make sense here. The reason stated for the closing of question the at the top of the page, for example, says this question needs clarity.”

Yes, your question does need clarity. Read below.

Your question never stated a problem other than you somehow correlating degraded performance with Firefox memory issues.

The comments there are very clear and honest. I even commented:

“The question is close and honestly it feels like you are engaging in confirmation bias between performance degradation and memory usage. I don’t believe Firefox memory usage plays a role here.”

So the reason why that “question” cannot be answered is there is no question. The more details that are needed for that question is simple: What is your real underlying problem?

Then you say this:

“The OP has asked three clear explicit questions and expects answers.”

Multiple issues here that is not going to win you friends or provide you answers:

  1. You are referring to your self in the third person as if you are advocating for someone else. You are simply upset your question was closed.

  2. This site is not about bundling three questions into one question; you need to focus on one issue and provide context for that issue. And these three questions all seem to basically be the same thing “Why is this happening?” And I will attempt to address them here in the context if why I voted to close

    1. Why is it so memory-expensive?”: Why do you see this as a problem? This is a modern web browser; all modern web browsers use more RAM than browsers of the past.
    2. Is this going to be fixed at all?”: Again, why do you see this as a problem? And why should this be “fixed”. If millions of people are using Firefox daily and see no problem, why are you — and only you — seeing this as a problem.
    3. Is there a way to lower the memory consumed by Firefox?”: Again, what do you think you will gain by “fixing” a “problem” that you have somehow decided is a problem only to you? Maybe there is a way to tweak Firefox to use less memory, but it will most likely degrade performance and still leave you with a system that has degraded performance because I will be anything that is not the core issue.

And finally, the title of this question is:

“A hidden passive-aggressive attitude toward questions”

The only passive aggressive attitude I see here comes from you are your overblown reaction to a question being closed. There is no passive aggression in the pile of comments site members — and not just moderators — have posted on that closed question. Multiple people are explaining the issue. Yet you refuse to ignore it and instead come here to complain referring to yourself in the third person; that alone is a massive act of passive aggression on your part.

If after you read all of this you are still insistent that Firefox is issues that need to be fixed, it might be best to report it directly to the developers at Mozilla. Who knows? Maybe there is something to what you posted.

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    Of course the OP isn’t the only one who considers high RAM usage a problem, and this has been reported multiple times on Bugzilla already. Of course there is also not really anything to be “fixed”. If lowering RAM usage is really an important concern for the OP, then they should simply follow the advancements in whichever Bugzilla ticket they like. – Sebastian Simon Nov 27 '20 at 11:17
  • @Giacomo1968 as user751213 said "this has been reported multiple times on Bugzilla already", so there are many people who consider this a problem. Clear? Besides, I am not reporting a bug to go to Bugzilla and I know when to do so. I want to discuss something with the community and you are chasing me to prove me wrong while you have already mentioned your point before in the main question and are reiterating that here. Why? Is it so hard to let other people express their opinions about what they think is a problem? And who told that yours is THE ANSWER. take it easy man. – Kamran Nov 29 '20 at 6:32
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    “I want to discuss something with the community” - We are not a discussion forum. If you want to discuss this topic come into a chat room. Wanting a discussion is absolutely a legitimate reason to close a question. Asking the reason Firefox uses a minimum amount of memory is an extremely broad question. Firefox has numerous background services that all require memory to function. – Ramhound Nov 29 '20 at 9:23
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    “Why? Is it so hard to let other people express their opinions about what they think is a problem?” Because nothing you are mentioning is a question and this is question and answer site. This is not a place to express an opinion and that is a problem. “I want to discuss something with the community…” this community is not a discussion community. What exactly do you expect from you question? Other people showing up and just saying, “Yeah! Me too! It’s terrible!” Those are not answers but simply whining. Your desire to discuss and chat is not what this community is about… Except for… (1/2) – Giacomo1968 Nov 29 '20 at 17:29
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    Except for these meta areas where discussion can happen but not about tech problems but asking for clarification about what happens on the main site, “…you are chasing me to prove me wrong while you have already mentioned your point before in the main question and are reiterating that here. Why?” Why? easy: Comments are ephemeral and often used to explain to the poster why a question is being received the way it is. That is what I did there. Now that you have chosen to bring this issue up in meta, I am posting a very clear answer that expands on what I said in comments. (2/2) – Giacomo1968 Nov 29 '20 at 17:31
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    Further point - 600MB RAM is nothing these days. If it's a worry you simply don't have enough RAM. Pretty much any web page these days is going to need 150MB or so, even simple text-based pages like on Stack Exchange, considerably more if it's media-intensive. My web browser is currently using about 10GB. Is it a worry? No. I have enough RAM. – Tetsujin Dec 14 '20 at 18:53

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