10

This question IMHO is a test question. Should it be closed as off-topic?

  • 1
    It should be closed for every reason except that it is a test question. - Low quality, too broad, not a real question, unclear what their problem actually is, learning material (technically) and generally being obvious "do my homework for me because I can't be bothered" garbage. If they at least made an attempt and justified what/why they were asking it might be acceptable... – Mokubai Apr 9 '18 at 21:32
  • Too broad? Its a multiple guess question. – Moab Apr 9 '18 at 22:17
  • There are too many unfocused questions on a diverse set of things. It has no real single problem. – Mokubai Apr 9 '18 at 22:21
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    Here’s another one. – Scott Apr 10 '18 at 2:28
  • Are test questions off topic? Often, but not because they're test questions. Should this be closed as off-topic? Without a second thought. – Duncan X Simpson Apr 17 '18 at 20:16
17

Test questions fall under the same umbrella as homework questions

That is, if there is a specific issue, or problem, or part that "can't quite be beaten into submission" it is potentially on-topic; as long as it's still about computer software or hardware as specified in the help centre.

However, if the questions are too abstract or requiring too long-winded an answer, they may be closeable as too broad, unclear what you're asking, or learning material-seeking, as any other question.

The usual standards with regards to showing research, being specific, and being an answerable question about a specific problem still apply.

Over at SO there is no policy specifically against homework questions per this MSO (see also this MSE dupe; though the tag was removed here.

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    Agreed. It is important to distinguish between a good (on topic, not too broad) question that happens to be associated with a test, and a simple "here is the test question, what is the answer". – Blackwood Apr 16 '18 at 4:25
11

To supplement bertieb's general answer, the specific question asked about here should be closed because:

  • It shows no research effort; what did the OP do to attempt to answer the question(s)? Where is he stuck and why? What information can't he find to make forward progress?
  • There are numerous questions within the same question. Some of them appear to rely on similar theoretical concepts to produce a correct answer; rather than asking about the specifics, the OP could ask for help understanding the theory that allows one to arrive at answers.
  • The questions have no context. Questions are only useful in terms of some greater context; having an answer simply for an answer's sake is pretty much clutter on the site. This is why I am not a big fan of test questions. Nobody else cares if you can demonstrate your knowledge answering a question unless you can tell us how this can be used to solve some problem or accomplish some task, even in principle. The OP hasn't provided any of that.
  • The structure of "true or false" questions is a terrible way to frame questions for a site on the SE network. Far better is to ask how something works, why something works they way it does, or anything else that promotes an informed discussion. A complete answer to his question(s) would just be a list of "true, false, true, true, ..." which provides neither the OP nor anyone else any knowledge of how to apply the theories and principles used to generate those responses.

All of these points are true regardless of whether or not the question was asked to cheat on a test/homework. The idea of the question being intended to help with homework (or to solve a homework problem in its entirety so the OP doesn't have to) is orthogonal to the question of what value it provides to our community. Here, it's pretty clear that it provides basically zero value because of the true/false structure, among other reasons.

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