0

I have a closed and locked question on superuser.

I believe it was closed because of my bad engllish and I put the words not correct and I could probably rephrase it to make more clear that it is absolutely an answerable and quite useful question and a subject that is fitting superuser well.

Or is it better to start with a new question?


I am not sure if this is the right place to explain this already.

So this is why I think it is useful:

The software libreoffice is an open source project. I have different versions on diffeerent computers running. It has bugs and I am awaitung new features. I have many times looked for a feature list of new versions or a list of fixed bugs. This is very useful to understand the software you are using.

So a possible answeer could be:

  • ODBC support was imroved in version 1.2.5 on February 2012
  • Tables can now be sorted by columns in the edit view since verson 1.2.7 on March 2012
  • A bug was fixed that could lead to a stackoverflow on 64 bit systems in Version 1.2.9 on Aprl 2012

This was the kind of answers that I am looking for.

Maybe it was a mistake to ask for 2 products in the same question. If I could edit I would remove one product in the quesiotn to make it not look like a "which is better" question (which I had not in mind)

migrated from meta.stackexchange.com Jan 25 '13 at 1:37

This question came from our discussion, support, and feature requests site for meta-discussion of the Stack Exchange family of Q&A websites.

1

You can't edit locked questions, only moderators can. Your question was locked because the migration got rejected, meaning that the question is now unlocked on the original site where you asked, here.

Your question was closed as not constructive because it doesn't ask a practical question. Listing out how software has evolved over the past couple years would not be acceptable anywhere on the Stack Exchange network. If you're really curious, go to their website and find some changelogs, etc that outline how things have been progressing over time.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .