6

I want to contact with website moderators about editing and modifying the topic I asked about and they put it on hold.

Because I want to know the parts to edit and also, sometimes even after you edit the topic they don't look it again.

My questions: 1. What's the procedure about how to alert the moderator that you edit the topic? 2. How to contact the moderator?

In regard on how to ask, I know that I have to be specific on a particular issue I have but in my last topic I wanted just to know some principle information about computers' buses. In specification aspects.

migrated from superuser.com Oct 30 '17 at 7:21

This question came from our site for computer enthusiasts and power users.

11

After you edit your question it is put into a review queue. Assuming your edits are good and bring your question on-topic for our site then it will be reopened and normally should not require the moderator (or users) who closed your question to be involved. The review for your question shows that several users did not feel that your question was brought on topic for us.

Your question is very broad and does not give any information about what your actual problem is beyond wanting a list of computer busses.

When you originally asked your question you were essentially asking for a list of computer busses and learning recommendations. At the moment you are still asking for "list of things" which is not a good fit for a question and answer site where we focus on solid fixable problems.

I've been learning about computer buses, I learned that there are two main types of computer buses:

  • Internal buses
  • External buses

My question is, I want the complete categorization with examples.

This is still too broad because there are many busses both internal and external and describing them all in sufficient detail, without simply copying a lot of Wikipedia articles, would be a massive undertaking. You would be better off buying a book on the subject. Your original question did ask for a reading recommendation, learning recommendations are also off topic here as we want to solve actual problems with computer hardware and software.

If one person posts one list while another posts a slightly different list, how would you choose which list is more correct?

From our help page What types of questions should I avoid asking?

You should only ask practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face. Chatty, open-ended questions diminish the usefulness of our site and push other questions off the front page.

Your questions should be reasonably scoped. If you can imagine an entire book that answers your question, you’re asking too much.

There are better places on the internet to list things out for you and Google is your friend in this case. The first link is to Wikipedia and the excerpt on Google shows a link to examples of internal/external busses.

If you were just asking about the specifications of one bus then that would not be "too broad". Asking about all of them is far too broad.

  • OK I understand now thank you very much, well it was a question for just listing the main types related to internal and external buses. Like the standard types for internal would be address, data and control buses and power bus also in other list I found on another website. External buses, like, USB, Ethernet, wireless. I actually wanted to be sure about the types of external buses. But anyway I would better to look in computer engineering eBooks. And thank you for your comprehensive, profound and sophisticated answer, that was a very clear answer to me. – R1S8K Oct 31 '17 at 5:47
4

Meta's the right place, though you need some minimum experience with the site to get here. New users ought to be able to ask questions on meta about their own questions, but clearly discoverability needs some work

Look at that question and this - you really ought to start by spending the time to understand why that question was closed.

I always point people at the help pages and the tour - simply because the information you need is there.

What's wrong with your question's on our don't ask page for example.

You should only ask practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face. Chatty, open-ended questions diminish the usefulness of our site and push other questions off the front page.

You're basically asking for a "I want the complete categorization with examples."

Contrast that to

"I have a Pentium II with an AGP port - could I plug in a modern PCIe card into it?"

Yeah, its contrived, but you have 1. A practical issue - an old PC with the need for a video card and a newer graphics card (that won't actually fit).

Your questions should be reasonably scoped. If you can imagine an entire book that answers your question, you’re asking too much.

There's a lot of buses in use - both internally and externally, so asking for all the possible buses is ... basically an entire book.

Assuming it was minor fixes - editing a post throws it into the reopen queue, and users with reopen rights can review and vote to reopen.

In this specific case, its pretty hard to 'fix' the question and narrow the scope to reopen it as I see it.

  • Yes, of course. It's not the first time I face rejection to my questions, but not all my questions. The ones where I ask for theoretical information don't find much of interest and get on hold, and the ones with the a practical problem get a normal reaction and not so much criticism. But, yeah thanks for the clarification :) – R1S8K Nov 3 '17 at 23:14

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .