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I was an unregistered user and my credentials was based on browser cookie(that's what the email said). After clicking the 'click here to restore your account cookie', I registered as advised in the mail.

While registering, I used OpenId as the preferred option. But now, I don't want to use that option, and want to sign in using the 'to-be created' new Stack Exchange account. How do I do this?

I know the steps partially. i.e., I can stop using Open-ID by using 'revoke access' in Google's authorized applications page.

What then? If I normally create an account in Stack Exchange page, will the credentials from my unregistered account be automatically added to this new registered account using the browser cookie?

(I doubt it because, when I previously logged out, I was told that all the browser cookie for this site will be deleted, since I was registered by now and didn't need the cookie anymore. But on the contrary, I think this will be done, because, the browser cookie was (supposedly) created when I logged in as registered user, and the cookie remains stayed when I revoked the open id access)

P.S.: I could skip asking this question and find out about this, by simply trying out and creating the new account in stack exchange and checking whether my credentials remained or not, but if its not, I'd end up having a registered and unregistered account which I don't want.

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Once logged in, head over to your profile, click on "My Logins", and then click on "Add login"

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It'll take you to the openID login page, select Stack Exchange, and create a new Stack Exchange openID from there.

What then? If I normally create an account in Stack Exchange page, will the credentials from my unregistered account be automatically added to this new registered account using the browser cookie?

You don't have an unregistered account. If you did, and if your browser cookies were present, your unregistered account would be merged with your new registered account

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