Hot answers tagged

19

Downvotes on their own are terrible mentoring. They lack context on their own for a new user, and much like puppies, some other input is needed. While comments are transient, in many cases pairing them with downvotes (or adding downvotes after a comment) may be efficient. I try to use positive reinforcement here and often comment rather than downvote, ...


17

Welcome to Stack Exchange! As you've noticed, voting is not always a good indicator of quality. In fact, trivial (or rather trite) questions tend to attract a lot of visits and thus a lot of votes — this is called the bikeshed effect. Everyone understands a simple answer to a simple question, so these get a lot of views and a lot of votes. The dominant ...


17

This has been discussed/requested many times on Meta Stack Overflow. The canonical response is here: Would it be possible to have a "community accepted" feature? The request is marked status-declined, under the premise that the question with the most upvotes is effectively the community-accepted answer. Actually marking an accepted answer is the ...


13

This has been discussed before on Meta Stack Overflow. Essentially, no. You cannot see who voted for you or anybody else, and nor can the moderators. Only Stack Exchange employees with direct database access can see individual votes. Voting is specifically designed to be anonymous.


11

He doesn't have enough reputation to downvote either questions or answers, so any downvotes are coming from another user. Please see here in the Help Center which explains that a user requires 125 reputation on the site to cast downvotes on either questions or answers. His comments will almost certainly result in him being banned (if that hasn't already ...


10

I disagree. I feel that questions are only worth 5 points. You're requesting information, needing to find an answer. Sure it might be a good question, but is a well written question worth as much as a big, well written, detailed answer? I don't think so. Reputation is meant to show your knowledge and expertise. By giving more reputation to questions, it ...


10

Downvotes on question do not cost anything to the downvoter. However, downvotes on answers do cost -1 rep to the downvoter.


10

You know, the big problem is that you can't tell users how to vote and what to vote for. Even if you tell them, you can't force them to do so, right? And, moreover, there's no way to find out who actually cast a vote. And even if it were, there wouldn't (currently) be a way to undo this. But, maybe we can find the interpretation when looking at what the ...


10

As a user who strives to earn reputation through good questions and answers, seeing this happen actually bothers me. We let perfectly good questions and answers that took users time and effort to create and put together, just slip by, almost ignored. Let's take a look at "Alternative to Windows Explorer for long path names". It was a well formed question, ...


10

While there may be a bit of truth to what you're saying, it seems like you are making a sweeping generalization that isn't necessarily true of everyone. This is a pretty large site, with a large community and lots of different viewpoints and philosophies. You seem to be making an uncited reference to one or more example questions where you found that it ...


9

This is all so hypothetical. Let's make it clear: You can't tell people not to vote up something they see. You can't tell people what to vote for (i.e. the "usefulness", the "lack of context") Thus, if you want to stop bad or poor posts from being created in the first place, you need a stronger reinforcement. What kind of reinforcement do we have? ...


9

First off, one job moderators have to do over and over is explaining people that they shouldn't care about the occasional downvote. Because it really does not matter. From all the experience I've gathered over the years here, I can honestly just tell you to shrug it off. And I know that this can be hard. I've received (seemingly random) downvotes on old ...


8

Is there ever a good reason for not to up-vote the answer (except for not having sufficient privileges)? Yes, the user decided that acceptance was enough of a reward. My original "answer" was just an aside that it's completely up to the user to decide to accept & vote up the answer. I can't read their mind, neither do I tell them to vote up. If their ...


8

How can I access the information? SEDE (Stack Exchange Data Explorer) is a provision for querying meta information. If you want to create your own queries, there is basic help here: https://data.stackexchange.com/help. There is a huge existing base of queries people have contributed. There is some really cool and useful stuff there, worth checking out. ...


7

I agree with ChimneyImp. Not many new users come in to Meta to ask that, and those that do will find out very quickly that they simply can't vote on their own question


7

Just a few quick points as I'm short on time: Questions that are closed are kept "live" in terms of allowing votes, comments, etc, because they can still be edited and reopened. Comments can help guide this process so are useful in this time. If this happens they become "normal" questions again, so limiting the voting wouldn't really serve any purpose. If ...


7

Im pretty sure that stackexchange uses proprietary software for their sites. there are some others that are very similar like QATO and OSQA. OSQA is opensource. http://www.osqa.net/


6

Executive summary: commenting to explain downvotes is a very good thing to do. Doing that consistently is far more important than shooting for any up/downvote ratio. Fortunately, we also have plenty more upvotes going around than downvotes. There's been some confusion regarding the statistics used in the question and its answers, so I'll take a moment to ...


5

It's been asked innumerable times on [Meta Stack Overflow] & status-declined. Quoting Jeff. I don't agree with this request. While "I agree" and "I disagree" is one way that votes can be used on meta, it is not the only way, and I don't want that indoctrinated into users as the "official" meaning of voting on meta. The current tooltips ...


5

It's not wrong to ask for review or guidance per se. For example, when I started out here, I didn't know much about OS X or Unix, and by the time, I learned more and more. I would have loved for knowledgeable users to review my answers and give constructive criticism. However, that is not equal to asking for upvotes. It doesn't work anyway. Note that the ...


5

In this case, you are viewing answers sorted based on last active date. This will override the default answer scores sorting and show the answer with the last activity (posting or editing) topmost.


5

In short, questions aren't what we want. We want answers. Great answers actually. To get great answers, we need great questions. The bad questions should die a horrible death. And they can only die that death if people downvote them. And people don't like downvoting when it costs them money reputation. So, why don't the same rules apply to answers? Because ...


5

Here are the hard facts: Your question was posted at 16:35:45Z Your first upvote was received on 16:35:51Z That's quite fast indeed. I'm pretty sure the person who upvoted you didn't read the question in its entirety. But since moderators cannot see who voted for which post, we'll never know who that person was or what made them vote so fast. This ...


5

Down vote requires 125 rep. Not sure how you concluded he down voted you. The user's a troll, just flag next time


5

How is it possible to get the Vox Populi badge for casting 40 votes per day if I've reached the daily limit at 36? To be able to reach 40 votes, you need to have cast at least 10 votes on questions. So vote on 10 questions first. You only get 40 votes in a day if a sufficiently high ratio of your votes are on questions. If you vote on only answers, ...


5

Before drawing any conclusions, I thought it was best to compile some data pertaining to Super User voting trends. I decided that one good method would be to examine the tendencies of our most active community members. Essentially, their proactive nature helps them (along with our moderators) serve as the public face of the Super User community. I ...


5

This is a personal reflection. I recognize that a substantial part of SU's strength is that we are not all the same. But this is what I think when I see down votes in certain contexts: My first beef is questions which are not spam with downvotes and no comments. Especially on questions from new users and low score users, this just raises my hackles. My ...


4

in a sense, they're right, but the downvote while its ultimate goal is not to punish, you can't get away from the fact that it does remove one rep point which is kind of a punishment. It is to alert them to it being wrong, so they notice.. but the fact is that as part of the gamification, there is this rep point thing that mentally provides reward, and ...


4

Do the up-votes I already gave other Q&As disappear, lowering back that user's reputation in the process […]? No. The votes you once cast can not be removed like that. The only exception, where votes "magically" disappear, is when you use your votes in a non-constructive way, e.g. by only voting for one user, or aggressively downvoting specific users. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible